SEC Filings

10-Q
TIME WARNER INC. filed this Form 10-Q on 10/26/2017
Entire Document
 


Table of Contents

TIME WARNER INC.

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

1.

DESCRIPTION OF BUSINESS AND BASIS OF PRESENTATION

Description of Business

Time Warner Inc. (“Time Warner” or the “Company”) is a leading media and entertainment company, whose businesses include television networks, and film and TV entertainment. Time Warner classifies its operations into three reportable segments: Turner: consisting principally of cable networks and digital media properties; Home Box Office: consisting principally of premium pay television services and a service that delivers video content to consumers over the internet (“OTT service”) domestically and premium pay, basic tier television and OTT services internationally; and Warner Bros.: consisting principally of television, feature film, home video and videogame production and distribution.

Basis of Presentation

Interim Financial Statements

The consolidated financial statements are unaudited; however, in the opinion of management, they contain all the adjustments (consisting of those of a normal recurring nature) considered necessary to present fairly the financial position, results of operations and cash flows for the periods presented in conformity with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles (“GAAP”) applicable to interim periods. The consolidated financial statements should be read in conjunction with the audited consolidated financial statements of Time Warner included in the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2016 (the “2016 Form 10-K”).

Basis of Consolidation

The consolidated financial statements include all the assets, liabilities, revenues, expenses and cash flows of entities in which Time Warner has a controlling interest (“subsidiaries”). Intercompany accounts and transactions between consolidated entities have been eliminated in consolidation.

Use of Estimates

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with GAAP requires management to make estimates, judgments and assumptions that affect the amounts reported in the consolidated financial statements and footnotes thereto. Actual results could differ from those estimates.

Significant estimates and judgments inherent in the preparation of the consolidated financial statements include accounting for asset impairments, multiple-element transactions, allowances for doubtful accounts, depreciation and amortization, the determination of ultimate revenues as it relates to amortization or impairment of capitalized film and programming costs and participations and residuals, home video and videogame product returns, business combinations, pension and other postretirement benefits, equity-based compensation, income taxes, contingencies, litigation matters, reporting revenue for certain transactions on a gross versus net basis, and the determination of whether the Company should consolidate certain entities.

Accounting Guidance Adopted in 2017

Share-Based Payments

On January 1, 2017, the Company adopted, on a prospective basis, new accounting guidance that changes the reporting for certain aspects of share-based payments. One aspect of the guidance requires that the income tax effects of share-based awards be recognized in the Income tax provision in the Consolidated Statement of Operations when the awards vest or are settled. Under the previous guidance, excess tax benefits and deficiencies were recognized in Additional paid-in capital in the Consolidated Balance Sheet. For the nine months ended September 30, 2017 and 2016, the amount of excess tax benefits, net of deficiencies, recognized in Income tax provision and Additional paid-in capital, respectively, was $130 million and $54 million, respectively. In addition, because excess tax benefits are no longer recognized in Additional paid-in capital under the new guidance, such amounts are no longer included in the determination of assumed proceeds in applying the treasury stock method when computing earnings per share. Another aspect of the new guidance requires that excess tax benefits be classified as a cash flow from operating activities, rather

 

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